Philadelphia Horse Farm
in july Elle Décor

Philadelphia Horse Farm
July 2017


HDA was featured in the illustrious Elle Decor Magazine the month - a six page article on our Philadelphia Horse Farm project completed late last year.  
Styled by Robert Rafino, photography by William Waldron, florals by Elena Seegers

Here are some extracts from the article, and you can see more images in our Gallery Section.
''The plan was to renovate while the couple, who both work in finance, temporarily moved into a new barn on the property. But when structural flaws that would have been costly to fix were discovered, the homeowners—by now delighted with he light-filled, loftlike barn where they were nesting—hit the brakes. “We started over,” the wife says. “We had this horrible realization that we were adding on to the wrong house. We thought, Let’s do it right.”''She is a decorative-arts fanatic who has fashioned everything from an urban apartment with a Renaissance feel to a Thai-inspired Miami Beach penthouse. “I knew we weren’t going to do ‘ye olde farmhouse,’” says Hamilton. “The warmth and modernism of Scandinavian design seemed perfect.”

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'The challenge, of course, was to invest new construction with a sense of intimacy.''
Hamilton’s decor brings in the life. Her approach: “Big with small, hard with soft—that’s design.” The wife’s directive was just as simple. “The house needs to be sanguine, comfortable, and durable,” she recalls telling her designer. “I wanted warmth and coziness with natural materials and textures, but I don’t like pattern.” So there are shearling rugs and nubby carpets underfoot, and acres of linen, raw silk, and canvas to soften the expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass. Milk paint gives the walls some patina. Cloud-shaped light fixtures float playfully above the master bed.'

Eastern Influence
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 The den, where the kids hang out, is entirely outfitted with outdoor furnishings by Paola Lenti—chic yet easy to wipe off if a cereal bowl tumbles from an armrest. “I call it ‘narrative decorating’—getting people’s real lives to look like what they want,” says Hamilton of the process. In this case, despite the twists and turns, it ended up happily ever after. “If something gets spilled or broken,” she observes, “it means they are having fun.”